Singapore

ACRES seeks information on marmoset found at Marine Crescent

ACRES seeks information on marmoset found at Marine Crescent
This female marmoset was found to be suffering from severe metabolic bone disease and had to be humanely euthanised. ACRES is appealing for information and is offering a $10,000 reward leading to the successful prosecution of the individual who had illegally kept this marmoset as a pet. Photo: ACRES' Facebook page
AVA is investigating the case and is in contact with relevant parties
Published: 8:05 PM, September 10, 2014
Updated: 8:37 PM, September 10, 2014

SINGAPORE — The Animal Concerns Research and Education Society (ACRES) has launched an urgent appeal for information regarding a black tufted marmoset that it found lying on a grass patch at Block 47 Marine Crescent last Friday.

The female marmoset was severely emaciated when discovered. Upon closer examination by the vets at the Singapore Zoo, it was found to be suffering from severe metabolic bone disease, said ACRES in a Facebook post today (Sept 10). As a result, the marmoset had to be humanely euthanised.

ACRES noted that marmosets are endemic to Brazil and it is illegal to keep them as pets in Singapore. They live in rainforests, residing high in trees and, as a result, are rarely observed at or near ground level. This is the first time ACRES has found a marmoset in Singapore, said a spokesperson.

ACRES has offered a S$10,000 reward for information leading to the “successful prosecution of the individual who illegally kept this marmoset as a pet”. The society can be contacted at its Wildlife Rescue Hotline, 9783 7782.

Meanwhile, the Agri-Food and Veterinary Authority of Singapore (AVA) said it is investigating the case and is in contact with the relevant parties. The AVA said the maximum penalty for smuggling endangered animals and their parts or products include a fine of S$50,000 a specimen - not exceeding S$500,000 in total - and a jail term of up to two years.

In a statement, AVA urged the public not to import wild animals or pets as it would fuel the illegal wildlife trade. In addition, "wild animals are not suitable pets as some may transmit diseases to humans and can be a public safety risk if mishandled or if they escape," a spokesperson said, adding that species, non-native to Singapore, could be a threat to biodiversity here. CHANNEL NEWSASIA