Asia

Strong quake shakes Indonesia's Sumatra; tremors felt in S'pore

Strong quake shakes Indonesia's Sumatra; tremors felt in S'pore
The US Geological Survey said the quake Sunday morning had a magnitude of 6.4 and occurred at a depth of 35km and was centered 74 kilometers (46 miles) west of the coastal city of Bengkulu. Photo: US Geological Survey
Published: 2:31 PM, August 13, 2017
Updated: 3:26 PM, August 13, 2017

 JAKARTA —  A strong earthquake struck Sunday (Aug 13) off the coast of southern Sumatra in Indonesia, causing panicked residents to run from their homes but no major damage.
 
The US Geological Survey said the quake Sunday morning had a magnitude of 6.4 and occurred at a depth of 35km.  
 
It was centered 74km west of the coastal city of Bengkulu and also felt in Singapore, about 590km from the epicenter. It did not generate a tsunami.
 
National Disaster Mitigation Agency spokesman Sutopo Purwo Nugroho said the quake was felt for about 10 seconds in coastal cities and was strong enough to shake belongings from shelves and topple furniture. 
 
Residents ran from their homes and there were power outages in some areas but no reports of casualties or structural damage to buildings, Mr Nugroho said.
 
"The intensity of the earthquake felt mild to moderate,'' he said.

Tremors were felt in certain parts of Singapore. The Singapore Civil Defence Force said in an update that they did not receive any calls for assistance. 
 

Earthquake in #Singapore pic.twitter.com/aQOifCKbk9

— PieterIdenburg (@MRPIE314) August 13, 2017

My fish tank also in wave, almost 3 min

— Danny Ng (@Maverick81737Ng) August 13, 2017

#earthquake - felt the sofa moving , building swinging in front ... #scary #singapore . Wonder where was the epicenter ?

— Rohit Dadwal (@rohitdadwal) August 13, 2017

#earthquake #singapore strong tremors felt at 11:15am in Singapore.could feel the building sway at level 16.hope all safe in Sumatra

— Tarun Kumar Kalra (@tarunkumarkalra) August 13, 2017

According to an advisory update, a local tsunami may be generated near the epicentre of the quake, but is unlikely to affect Singapore.

Indonesia, the world's largest archipelago, is prone to the seismic upheaval and tsunamis due to its location on major geological faults known as the Pacific ``Ring of Fire.''
 
In 2004, an extremely powerful Indian Ocean quake set off a tsunami that killed more than 230,000 people in a dozen countries, most of them in Indonesia's Aceh province in northern Sumatra.