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The definitive guide to eating your way through the freshest seafood in South Australia

Blue swimmer, yabbie or prawn? The definitive guide to eating your way through the freshest seafood in South Australia. You’re welcome, Singapore.

    The definitive guide to eating your way through the freshest seafood in South Australia

Blue swimmer, yabbie or prawn? The definitive guide to eating your way through the freshest seafood in South Australia. You’re welcome, Singapore Words: Monica Chew Silly about shellfish? Then you’ve hit the jackpot. When it comes to seafood, South Australia means business, literally – the state is the second largest producer of seafood in the country with a gross value that hit a whopping $441 million in 2013. There are so many varieties of fresh shellfish and seafood easily available at Adelaide Central Market but here are some of the top shellfish choices in the state to whet your appetite. Blue Swimmer Crab
Photo: Shutterstock.com It’s better known in our region as the “flower crab”, with males sporting a mottled bright blue to purple shell and females… well the females got stuck with a dullish green-brown coat. But when cooked, both genders turn a satisfying orange. Very much unlike the mud crabs that we’re used to eating with their fat pincers and thick shells, the blue swimmer crab is slimmer in stature (mud crabs average in at 1kg while blue swimmer crabs usually weigh around 400g) and has a more delicate-tasting flesh that is slightly sweet and nutty. The best way to eat them? Simply steamed, poached, or boiled and dipped in melted butter with a squeeze of lemon juice. As blue swimmer crabs don’t keep well, you will definitely be able to taste the freshness (or lack thereof). If you’re not into picking out the meat yourself, blue swimmer crab meat is also
These adorable little crustaceans look like mini-lobsters or prawns trying to play dress-up, but they’re actually a type of freshwater crayfish. Both wild-caught and farmed, yabbies generally measure in at 12cm in length and are best eaten au naturel, boiled in pots and served in large platters, and usually accompanied by beer and butter. Like the blue swimmer crab, yabbies taste better when cooked fresh than frozen. Beware the overcooked yabbie as the meat becomes tough and chewy with prolonged heating. If you’re cooking them yourself, make sure you keep the head and shell as these make amazing stock for soups and sauces.
Prawns are a big deal in South Australia; in 2012–13 prawn production accounted for 53 percent of total volume of wild-caught crustaceans. The state also has sustainable certification on their green prawns, which is a plus. One of the key species in the state is the king prawn, usually caught off the southern coast in Spencer Gulf. Singaporeans already know their stuff when it comes to prawns, so take full advantage of the supreme freshness and cheaper price tags to make sure you get your fill and more. Whether barbecued and dipped in chilli, tossed in with salads, stir-fried with ginger and green onions, grilled with coriander and pepper, or steamed in a bag with garlic, white wine, lemon, and parsley, the world is your oyster when it comes to prawns in South Australia. Marron
Source: staykangerooisland.com The third largest freshwater crayfish in the world, marron are farmed in Kangaroo Island and take three years to mature. They are generally jet-black or brown in colour and can grow up to almost 40cm in total length. Although large in size, marron are incredibly sensitive to their environment and because of their scarcity, are somewhat of a delicacy. The taste and texture of their meat has been likened to frog’s legs and can be enjoyed by simply boiling them before seasoning lightly with salt pepper and white vinegar, so you don’t mess around too much with their delicate flavour. Mussels
Fresh mussels from Boston Bay off Port Lincoln are a must try – so gorgeously plump and meaty, you’ll question why you ever settled for those frozen supermarket ones back in Singapore. Prepare them steamed with your favourite broth but remember as with all things so fresh, keep the recipe simple (i.e. we’d recommend holding back on any creamy sauces) so you can really taste the goodness of the sea. Oysters
World renowned for their quality, flavour, and size, Coffin Bay Oysters are one of those things that have to be on your bucket list when it comes to South Australia. There are many ways to enjoy a fresh oyster but if you ask us how we’d recommend to consume them, less is definitely more. Freshly shucked, squeeze of lemon and a dash of hot sauce. No garnish necessary. What can we say, we love these bad boys so much they got their own page For more information on South Australia, visit todayonline.com/southaustralia

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