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Welcome to the future

Welcome to the future

Source: imdb.com The arrival of a 5G network will bring with it life-saving wearable technology and a ‘brain-net’ that transmits feelings and memories, say scientists Words: Theresa Tan Whether you’re looking for a mobile plan that grants you student perks or a plan with high data allocation and no contract, Singtel has the mobile plan A decade ago, humans did not share videos of how they bathed their pet cats. Nor did they walk through retail stores holding up their phones, talking to an invisible audience of thousands on social media. Today, data is an inextricable part of our modern lives. Each day in 2015, the world created 2.5 quintillion (2,500,000,000,000,000,000) bytes of data. And it’s not going to slow down anytime soon. In the Cisco Visual Networking Index: Global Mobile Data Traffic Forecast white paper, released in February, it is
Singtel has the mobile plan

A decade ago, humans did not share videos of how they bathed their pet cats. Nor did they walk through retail stores holding up their phones, talking to an invisible audience of thousands on social media.

Today, data is an inextricable part of our modern lives.

Each day in 2015, the world created 2.5 quintillion (2,500,000,000,000,000,000) bytes of data. And it’s not going to slow down anytime soon.

In the Cisco Visual Networking Index: Global Mobile Data Traffic Forecast white paper, released in February, it is predicted that by 2020, monthly global mobile data traffic will be 30.6 exabytes (that’s 1 quintillion bytes). The total number of smartphones (including phablets) will be nearly 50 per cent of global devices and connections. Monthly mobile tablet traffic will surpass 2.0 exabytes per month.

That’s a lot of cat videos.

OF PIKACHUS AND LIFE-SAVERS

Source: Kotaku.com Although there are critics who say so much connectivity creates alienation of the individual, the fact remains that the individual — that’s you — stands to benefit tremendously. Wearables like smart watches may currently be seen more as a cool accessory than an integral part of daily life, but these devices will soon be less reliant on your mobile phone, connecting directly to cellular networks. That means being able to use Internet-dependent apps, make and receive calls, and even video calls — literally at a flick of your wrist.
Source: giphy.com These little devices are changing the way we’ll have access to healthcare. The Sidly Care, for example, is described as the “Swiss Army Knife of medical wearables”. Hospitals in Europe have begun using this silicon band to not just monitor heart rate and temperature, but also to remind patients to take their medication, detect falls, and alert a doctor in case of emergency. All readings are wirelessly transmitted in real-time to the healthcare professionals, wherever they may be.
Source: makeagif.com Even as we feed the growing obsession over catching Weedles, Bulbasaurs and Pikachus with the Augmented Reality game Pokémon GO, there is great excitement about Virtual Reality with the launch this year of the Oculus Rift and HTC Vive. Sure, the Japanese make saving a fake kitten from a ledge look like great fun, but the applications for VR go beyond just gaming: Films would be immersive; a paralysed person could virtually travel to another country. VR is already being used in therapy, treating war veterans for post-traumatic stress disorder by bringing them back into a scenario that is fearful to them, but within a safe environment.
saving a fake kitten from a ledge look like great fun, but the applications for VR go beyond just gaming: Films would be immersive; a paralysed person could virtually travel to another country. VR is already being used in therapy, treating war veterans for post-traumatic stress disorder by bringing them back into a scenario that is fearful to them, but within a safe environment.

Source: makeagif.com It’s a brave new world. And it runs on data connectivity. This has created the need for data to be cost-efficient. According to a study by the International Telecommunication Union (ITU), the United Nations agency for information and communication technologies, mobile surfing in Singapore is already the ninth most affordable in the world — remarkable, considering our mobile technology is one of the most cutting edge globally. And it continues to get better. To help improve the mobile service experience for Singapore consumers, the Infocomm Development Authority of Singapore launched the MyConnection SG. The crowdsourcing mobile app collects data about broadband speed, latency, coverage on 3G & 4G mobile cellular networks, and usage experiences on WiFi networks. The results for the first six months of the year show Singtel having the fastest network
first six months of the year show Singtel having the fastest network with the lowest latency. Singtel also boasts the widest coverage — a position consistently maintained since Q4 2014.

FROM INTERNET TO ‘BRAIN-NET’

Source: tumblr.com So what does a future fuelled by such rapidly developing network technology look like? If futurists are to be believed, the next two decades will see wearable mobile devices blanketing the world, said Dr James Canton, CEO of Global Futures to HuffPost Science. He predicts “a massive Internet of everyone and everything linking every nation, community, company and person to all of the world’s knowledge”, accelerating real-time access to education, health care, jobs, entertainment and commerce. Networks, predicted famed futurist Dr Michio Kaku in the same story, will allow not just for seeing and hearing, but feeling. “In the next 10 years, we will see the gradual transition from an Internet to a brain-net, in which thoughts, emotions, feelings, and memories might be transmitted instantly across the planet,” he said.
Source: giphy.com Forget emojis — teenagers, predicted Dr Kaku, “will go crazy on social media, sending memories and sensations from their senior prom, their first date, et cetera”. More significantly, “historians and writers will be able to record events not just digitally, but also emotionally as well.” This is a future facilitated by connected devices and powered by 5G — touted to be 10 times faster than 4G LTE. Singtel aims to be one of the first operators in the world to deploy 5G. Remember: The iPhone was released just nine years ago. And in those nine years, technology — network, hardware and software — has advanced so rapidly and so broadly, just looking at the original iPhone feels like one’s watching an episode of Growing Up. Imagine what’s to come. Adapted from the feature story Connect the Future on ChannelNewsAsia.com

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