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Crocodile appears in Sungei Kadut drain, gets caught

SINGAPORE — A crocodile appeared in a drain along Sungei Kadut Drive on Friday (June 21), with photos and videos of the reptile emerging on social media.

Crocodile appears in Sungei Kadut drain, gets caught

In one video, the crocodile was seen lying on its side, unmoving, as onlookers peered at it from behind the safety of railings.

SINGAPORE — A crocodile appeared in a drain along Sungei Kadut Drive on Friday (June 21), and it has been captured and transferred to a crocodile farm.

Photos and videos of the reptile emerged on social media, with one video showing the crocodile lying on its side, unmoving, as onlookers peered at it from behind the safety of railings.

Credit: Social media One photo showed the crocodile with its limbs and snout tied up and its head covered.

In response to TODAY's queries, the National Parks Board (NParks) said it was alerted to the sighting of an Estuarine crocodile in a drain at 8.20am on Friday.

"NParks officers worked with our trained contractors to secure the crocodile. It has since been translocated to a crocodile farm," NParks said.

It advises members of the public who encounter a crocodile to "stay calm and back away slowly".

"They should not approach, provoke, or feed the animal," NParks said. "The public may also call the Animal Response Centre at 1800-476-1600 or contact us at www.avs.gov.sg/feedback to report the encounter."

Separately, PUB said in a statement on Friday evening that it was aware of the crocodile’s capture.

“PUB officers will be patrolling the surrounding drains in Sungei Kadut and the nearby Kranji Reservoir over the next few days to ensure that there are no further crocodile sightings,” it said.

This is not the first time that a crocodile has wandered into an urban area this year.

On Feb 23, a 1.7m Estuarine crocodile was caught at Lower Seletar Reservoir more than a week after it was first spotted.

Initial sightings of the crocodile on Feb 14 had caused all water and fishing activities to be ceased within the reservoir.

The saltwater crocodile is one of the largest in the world and can grow to more than 5m.

They inhabit brackish and freshwater areas such as coastal areas and wetlands.

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