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Expat hurls vulgarities after getting 7 weeks’ jail for drunken attack on taxi driver, police

SINGAPORE — An Australian was sentenced to seven weeks’ jail on Friday (Sept 27) for pushing a taxi driver after failing to pay his fare, then hitting a police officer and swearing at him and his colleague.

Expat hurls vulgarities after getting 7 weeks’ jail for drunken attack on taxi driver, police

The court heard that Scott John Ashby, 46, an Australian, pushed a taxi driver after not paying his fare, then lashed out at a police officer who was called to the scene.

SINGAPORE — An Australian was sentenced to seven weeks’ jail on Friday (Sept 27) for pushing a taxi driver after failing to pay his fare, then hitting a police officer and swearing at him and his colleague.

After the district court hearing concluded, an agitated Scott John Ashby, a 46-year-old former consultant, proclaimed: “F*** you, f*** this country!”

He had earlier pleaded guilty to one charge of causing hurt to the 43-year-old taxi driver, Mr Oh Kuan Hui, and using criminal force on a public servant. A third charge of using abusive language on a public servant was taken into consideration for sentencing.

Before pleading guilty, Ashby exchanged words with District Judge Christopher Tan, who had to remind him not to interrupt proceedings when the court was in session.

When the judge told him that nobody could force him to plead guilty, Ashby responded: “You are, Your Honour! I have lost my job.”

“I am trying to be patient because I know you are frustrated. There will be court decorum and it will be respected. Mr Too, would you like to take instructions?,” District Judge Tan asked Ashby’s lawyer, Mr Too Xing Ji.

Without waiting for his lawyer to respond, Ashby shouted: “I do not need to!”

The judge chided him for interrupting and called for a short break. Ashby then admitted to the charges.

DRUNK AT 9.30PM

The court heard that the incident happened on Sept 10 last year, when Mr Oh picked Ashby up at a taxi stand near Suntec City at 9.30pm. The taxi driver observed that Ashby was drunk.

They arrived at Ashby’s destination 10 minutes later. When he could not locate his house, he alighted without paying the fare of S$16.70.

Mr Oh immediately got out of the vehicle as well and asked Ashby to pay up. In response, Ashby pushed him twice on the chest, causing him to fall to the ground.

Ashby pushed Mr Oh again into the metal gate of a house when he stood up, dislodging one of its panels.

The taxi driver proceeded to call the police and told Ashby not to go anywhere.

Two police officers arrived 15 minutes later and asked Ashby for his particulars. He initially refused to provide them, but eventually took his employment pass out of his wallet and threw it on the ground, saying to the police officer: “F***ing take it.”

The officer tried to calm Ashby down and interview him again. However, he insisted on leaving and refused to reveal what happened earlier.

As he walked away from them, the officer decided to arrest him. Ashby swung his hands and arms aggressively at the officer, hitting the other man in the lip.

The officers eventually subdued Ashby and handcuffed him, as he kept shouting vulgarities at them.

He later admitted to drinking five 500ml cans of Anchor beer with his friends that night.

In mitigation, Mr Too told the court that Ashby used to suffer from depression. He had worked in Singapore for 15 years and has two young children with his ex-wife, and cannot remain in Singapore after serving his sentence as he had lost his job and employment pass, the lawyer added.

For causing hurt, Ashby could have been jailed up to two years, or fined up to S$5,000, or both.

For using criminal force on a public servant, he could have been jailed for up to four years, or fined, or both.

Related topics

verbal abuse drunk court crime jail taxi driver police

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