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MFA expresses regret, disappointment at Delhi chief minister's 'unfounded' claims of 'Singapore variant'

SINGAPORE — The Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MFA) has expressed regret and disappointment over “unfounded assertions” made on social media by the Delhi chief minister about a supposed Covid-19 variant found in Singapore.

Mortuary workers load the body of a person who died from Covid-19 to an ambulance for cremation, at a hospital in New Delhi, India on May 5, 2021.

Mortuary workers load the body of a person who died from Covid-19 to an ambulance for cremation, at a hospital in New Delhi, India on May 5, 2021.

SINGAPORE — The Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MFA) has expressed regret and disappointment over “unfounded assertions” made on social media by the Delhi chief minister about a supposed Covid-19 variant found in Singapore.

On Tuesday (May 18), Mr Arvind Kejriwal had said on Facebook and Twitter that the “Singapore variant” was particularly dangerous to children and could cause a third wave of infections in India.

In a statement on Wednesday, MFA said it was “disappointed that a prominent political figure had failed to ascertain the facts before making such claims”.

The ministry added that its officials met the High Commissioner of India P Kumaran on Wednesday morning to "express these concerns".

Singapore’s Foreign Minister Vivian Balakrishnan also took to Twitter to respond to Mr Kejriwal, saying: “Politicians should stick to facts! There is no 'Singapore variant'."

On Tuesday, the Ministry of Health (MOH) refuted news reports in India on the "Singapore variant", adding that “there is no truth whatsoever in the assertions found within the reports”.

On Wednesday, MFA reiterated MOH’s findings that the strain prevalent in many recent Covid-19 cases in Singapore is the B16172 variant, which was first detected in India.

Related topics

Covid-19 coronavirus India MOH MFA

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