Skip to main content

Advertisement

Advertisement

NTU profile test helps students assess if they should take business degree

SINGAPORE — Students keen on pursuing a degree in business were given a glimpse into whether they are cut out for a career in this field through a personality profile test offered by Nanyang Technological University (NTU) Nanyang Business School on Tuesday (Jan 24).

NTU profile test helps students assess if they should take business degree

Pre-university students taking the profile test at Nanyang Technological University's Nanyang Business School on Tuesday (Jan 24). Photo: NTU

SINGAPORE — Students keen on pursuing a degree in business were given a glimpse into whether they are cut out for a career in this field through a personality profile test offered by Nanyang Technological University (NTU) Nanyang Business School on Tuesday (Jan 24).

Forty-five students awaiting their A-Level results took the 15-minute test at the school’s annual DiscoverU event for pre-university students to give them a look into the types of jobs available for those undertaking a business degree.

Nanyang Business School adapted the well-known DISC personality test, which classifies people according to their traits under Dominance, Influencing, Steadiness and Compliant categories, to help students identify their character, skills, values and interests to match them with suitable degrees at the school and its accompanying career paths.

Associate Dean (Undergraduate Academic) at NTU's Nanyang Business School Low Kin Yew said every year, he sees up to five undergraduate students asking to switch degrees because they felt they were not suited for their existing course of study. He hopes the test will cut down on some of these situations.

He said: “The students can get a better understanding about themselves... having greater awareness of exactly who they are, what they want... (The test) will guide them in their career selection, and hopefully they will be happy here.”

In the pilot run of the profile test last year, the business school said of the 60 students who took it, only half ended up applying to the school. Going ahead, it will be offering the test every year as part of its programme for pre-university students.

One student who found the test useful was Jolene Phua. The 19-year-old, who was unsure of her career path, is now considering a career in human resources or public relations, after finding out she is an “on-the-go, impulsive person”.

Read more of the latest in

Advertisement

Popular

Advertisement

Stay in the know. Anytime. Anywhere.

Subscribe to get daily news updates, insights and must reads delivered straight to your inbox.

By clicking subscribe, I agree for my personal data to be used to send me TODAY newsletters, promotional offers and for research and analysis.

Aa