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Police warn of phishing scam involving fake bank ads and lucky draws

SINGAPORE — The police on Monday (Oct 19) warned of a new phishing scam that involves fake bank advertising campaigns and lucky draws which seek the victim’s banking details, resulting in unauthorised withdrawals.

The police said on Oct 19, 2020 that the scammers try to obtain victims' personal details including banking details.

The police said on Oct 19, 2020 that the scammers try to obtain victims' personal details including banking details.

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SINGAPORE — The police on Monday (Oct 19) warned of a new phishing scam that involves fake bank advertising campaigns and lucky draws which seek the victim’s banking details, resulting in unauthorised withdrawals.

The scam takes the form of WhatsApp messages supposedly sent by a local bank, or fake Facebook advertisements from a bank that invite users to participate in lucky draws or promotions, the police said in a statement on Monday.

The messages or advertisements contain a link that redirects victims to a fake bank website where they are prompted to provide internet banking details including one-time passwords (OTPs).

An advertisement posted by the scammers on Facebook. Image: Singapore Police Force

Most victims realise they have been scammed only after being informed of unauthorised bank transactions, said the police.

The police advised members of the public to steer clear of clicking on links in unsolicited advertisements and text messages.

They are also urged to confirm the authenticity of information with official websites, avoid disclosing personal banking or other details and OTPs, and report unauthorised bank transactions.

Members of the public may visit www.police.gov.sg/witness or call the police hotline at 1800-255-0000 to provide information on such scams. For more information on scams, the public can visit www.scamalert.sg or call the Anti-Scam Hotline at 1800-722-6688.

Image of the phishing website used by the scammers. Image: Singapore Police Force

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