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Sungei Buloh reserve extension to showcase trails, guided walks

SINGAPORE — Visitors to the Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve will be able to step on mudflats, cross a suspension bridge and take a stroll along a coastal boardwalk, once a new 31ha extension opens on Dec 6.

Regent Secondary School students walking past one of the five viewing pods, which will give visitors an elevated, unobstructed view of the surroundings, at the Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve. Photo: Don Wong

Regent Secondary School students walking past one of the five viewing pods, which will give visitors an elevated, unobstructed view of the surroundings, at the Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve. Photo: Don Wong

SINGAPORE — Visitors to the Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve will be able to step on mudflats, cross a suspension bridge and take a stroll along a coastal boardwalk, once a new 31ha extension opens on Dec 6. 

The grand opening, which coincides with the reserve’s 21st anniversary, will also see the launch of six new guided walks around the wetlands. The extension at Kranji Way, which includes mangrove and coastal forests, will have three nature trails totalling 1.65km and a new visitor centre. 

Visitors can make their way across the 120m suspension bridge in the heart of a secondary forest and spot birds and insects in the mid-canopy region and forest floor. 

Those looking for a more immersive experience can step on mudflats during low tide to look for crabs, worms and mudskippers. 

Of the six free guided walks that the National Parks Board (NParks) is introducing — on top of an existing guided tour — two will cater to children under 12. During those two tours, led by students from Regent Secondary School, the children will be taught to identify common species of flora and fauna found at the reserve and the need for conservation. 

The six walks, lasting one-and-a-half hour each and led by public and student volunteers, will be held on Saturday mornings on a rotational basis. 

Each walk can accommodate up to 15 participants. 

The wetland reserve sees an average of 100,000 visitors each year, but NParks hopes that the opening of the new ecological space will draw more people to the area.

Ms Sharon Chan, the reserve’s deputy director, said: “Over the years, we’ve seen a rising number of visitors going to the reserve. With these numbers, there will be an impact on the wildlife found there. We thought it’ll be a good idea to expand so that we can reach out to more people.”

The expansion plans took into account comments from the public.

“We do take note of the feedback … that the reserve is not very accessible, so we’ve brought it closer to people by building the extension closer to Kranji Reservoir Park,” Ms Chan said. Visitors can access the extension via a new entrance to the reserve at Kranji Way. The current entrance at Neo Tiew Crescent remains.

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