Skip to main content

Advertisement

Advertisement

Videos of Singapore '100% not sponsored', says travel vlogger Nas Daily

SINGAPORE — After some online users questioned his positive reviews of Singapore, popular travel blogger Nuseir Yassin, better known as the founder of Nas Daily, on Thursday (Aug 30) publicly defended his videos and reiterated that he was not sponsored to produce them.

Videos of Singapore '100% not sponsored', says travel vlogger Nas Daily

Blogger Nuseir Yassin poses with Singaporeans who gathered at a recent meetup.

SINGAPORE — After some online users questioned his positive reviews of Singapore, popular travel blogger Nuseir Yassin, better known as the founder of Nas Daily, on Thursday (Aug 30) came out to defend his videos and made clear that he was not sponsored to produce them.

In a Facebook post, geo-fenced such that it is visible only to those in Singapore, he responded to accusations that he was sponsored or paid to make positive videos about the Republic.

"These people are wrong. My videos in Singapore are 100 per cent not sponsored by anyone. I came here by myself, spent my own money, to make my own videos about your country. And I need to make sure everyone is aware of that," he said.

He added that he wanted to show the best of the world because mainstream media often focuses on the negative. Instead, he wants his videos to focus on the positive, he said.

"It is disheartening to see people discredit my work because of unfounded allegations. I know most of my videos are positive. But what can I do? You guys actually have some stuff figured out that many countries don't have figured out!" he wrote on Facebook. 

Responding to queries from TODAY on Friday, Mr Yassin said it was "not the first time" his vlogs had received such reaction. “The same thing happened in Malta, where I fell in love with that country and there too people thought I was sponsored," he said.

He added that people "always assume" that the videos are sponsored "because they can't imagine someone doing something positive for free". "I think Singapore has many issues with people and government, and naturally anyone that comes and makes videos about things that matter will be in the middle of that storm," he said.

He added: "Don’t get me wrong, I still do sponsored deals and charge a ton for them. But it’s not the case in Singapore or Malta. And I genuinely like this place. It seems like that’s hard to believe for some Singaporeans.” 

Mr Yassin said he was not "really surprised" by those questioning if his videos were sponsored, and added it's a "natural reaction". He reiterated: "No government has invited me here. I want people to remember that these videos come from pure love of being here in Singapore."

The 26-year-old Arab-Israeli social media personality, who has 7.7 million followers on his Facebook page, has been travelling the world in the last 873 days (or 2 years and four months). He makes daily one-minute videos to document his experiences.

Arriving in Singapore on Aug 21 - his fifth time here - he hosted a spontaneous meet-up with some 700 people at the Singapore Indoor Stadium on a day's notice the next day.

Since then, he has published videos of his visit, including "Why I hate Singapore", which has garnered 3.6 million views. In it, he explained how he was "jealous" of the progress the Republic has made, such as efforts at promoting racial and religious tolerance.

He also made videos about Changi Airport, dumpster diver Daniel Tay, and Singapore's landfill system, which drew between 4.2 million and 9.2 million views.

While the videos were met mostly with positive comments online, they have also drawn some flak from Singaporeans, who pointed out that beneath its glowing appearances, Singapore has issues with unemployment, income inequality and the high cost of living.

Some also noted that while he highlighted in his video how Singapore has found a way to deal with its waste, its recycling rates were low. Others accused him of being a "sponsored media influencer".

On how he managed to gain access at short notice to hard-to-access places featured in his videos, such as the Semakau landfill, Mr Yassin told TODAY that he merely “put out a request to my followers and using their connections they emailed whoever needs to be emailed and (told) them I need access”.

“The followers are the best! Government agencies on their end, know that Nas Daily means a lot of publicity and often times they comply fast,” he said. “But regardless, I’m the one who makes up the ideas, the creative, and the story. And my followers make it happen!”

 

 

 

Read more of the latest in

Advertisement

Popular

Advertisement

Stay in the know. Anytime. Anywhere.

Subscribe to get daily news updates, insights and must reads delivered straight to your inbox.

By clicking subscribe, I agree for my personal data to be used to send me TODAY newsletters, promotional offers and for research and analysis.

Aa