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Cyclists, pedestrians should be mindful of each other

I agree with Mr Bernard Sim’s letter, “Cyclists have right of way too, shouldn’t be singled out” (Sept 23).

Tay Yong Hong

I agree with Mr Bernard Sim’s letter, “Cyclists have right of way too, shouldn’t be singled out” (Sept 23).

Singapore is going for a clean and green environment and promoting an active society.

Cycling, as a solution, does not pollute the environment or consume petrol. It burns calories, making us healthier. It is the most economical mode of transport.

While cycling on walkways may not be encouraged, let us remember that some cyclists are our next-door elderly uncles and aunties who need to get around the neighbourhood. Children, too, can cycle to school or to their tuition centre.

If we say cycling on pavements is an offence punishable by a fine, as accidents would cause injuries, we then drive these groups of cyclists onto the road, where an accident would amount to severe injuries or even death.

Until we find a feasible solution, both cyclists and pedestrians should be mindful when using the pathways. Pedestrians who read and text on their phones while walking with their earphones on could be at fault too.

Many pedestrians think they have the right of way on pavements and can occupy both the footpath and cycling path, and even bicycle crossings.

Cyclists and pedestrians must co-exist and share the walkways where cycle paths are still not available.

In coming up with cyclist and pedestrian codes, the authorities should, for example, ensure that both groups keep to the left of the path unless overtaking. Where the path is narrow, pedestrians and cyclists should keep in a single file.

Mobile phones and earphones should not be used on paths.

A single tinkle from a bicycle bell should serve to remind pathway users to move to the left, if they are not already, and that a cyclist is behind.

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