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Even during a protest, civility is necessary

It was disconcerting to read of a way of protest developing in Singapore that has come close to burning effigies of a minister and defacing a poster of the Prime Minister. (“Police advise protest organiser against defacing poster of PM Lee”; May 1)

It was disconcerting to read of a way of protest developing in Singapore that has come close to burning effigies of a minister and defacing a poster of the Prime Minister. (“Police advise protest organiser against defacing poster of PM Lee”; May 1)

People should vent their angst in a proper manner.

Even civil disobedience, which is far from violating images of people, has the word ‘civil’ in it.

A caricature of someone is one thing; there is always an element of humour. However, to encourage possible thoughts of violence is another.

Have people forgotten that a troubled person set alight a Member of Parliament some years ago?

Some of us dislike what ensues from the economic forces of capitalism and globalisation that shape political decisions, but there is no reason to encourage an anger festival.

Singapore does not exist in a vacuum; there are not only domestic, but also regional and international issues it must deal with.

Would it be a tautology to state that Singapore needs goodwill from the world?

Are those who support calls that can sadly lead to fanning hate against certain communities going to hold themselves responsible for any unintended results?

Are those excited about venting their frustration at their difficulties going to end them by sowing discord, rather than getting people to discuss the issues involved?

Are those who want political change so bereft of faith in their candidates that they must raise blood pressures all around as a means of getting some people elected because they cannot otherwise convince voters?

Thus far, the public figures whose images might be scolded and shouted at belong to the ethnic majority in Singapore.

Would the dynamics of the situation change if it involves ethnic and religious minorities?

Mahatma Gandhi and Martin Luther King Jr were genuine leaders who stood for their beliefs and answered for the consequences of their actions and those of their supporters.

If those trying to claim a mantle of leadership point their fingers to their supporters and troublemakers when things go wrong, and evade accountability, then they would be charlatans.

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