Skip to main content

Advertisement

Advertisement

Beijing 2022: IOC says ‘no decision’ yet on fans

HONG KONG — The International Olympic Committee said it is still waiting on a decision from Beijing 2022 as to whether there will be fans at the 2022 Winter Olympics, and how that will play into China’s much publicised “closed loop” management system to quell the spread of Covid-19 during the Games.

Beijing 2022: IOC says ‘no decision’ yet on fans

Beijing 2022 will impose a “closed-loop management system” according to organisers, which means that all attendees, including volunteers, officials and athletes will be inside a bubble scenario within each venue and accompanying infrastructure.

HONG KONG — The International Olympic Committee said it is still waiting on a decision from Beijing 2022 as to whether there will be fans at the 2022 Winter Olympics, and how that will play into China’s much publicised “closed loop” management system to quell the spread of Covid-19 during the Games.

Mr Pierre Ducrey, the IOC’s Olympic Games operations director, said they are still waiting on word from Chinese officials, as first reported by Inside the Games.

The Olympics are set to kick off on Feb 4 and run until the 20th at a number of venues in and around Beijing, which will become the first city to host both a Summer and Winter Olympics in modern history.

“On the circumstances around which fans will be able to come to the venues and how this will take place, I would refer to the Organising Committee,” Mr Ducrey said. “There has been no decision at this point in time.”

Beijing 2022 will impose a “closed-loop management system” according to organisers, which means that all attendees, including volunteers, officials and athletes will be inside a bubble scenario within each venue and accompanying infrastructure.

The IOC has stated they are confident Beijing 2022 will not result in a surge in cases. Tokyo 2020 saw a rise in cases during the Games.

Beijing has released a number of playbooks on how they will combat the potential spread of Covid-19 at the Games, which includes extremely strict measures and daily testing for athletes.

Mr Ducrey said that around 1,000 people have already entered the system since it was first set up in early January and they feel confident the system will hold during the Games, however there have yet to be any local fans to enter the system.

Last year Chinese organising officials announced there will be no international spectators at the Games. Tokyo 2020 did not have fans at most of its events.

“The loop is very safe and is a place that is very difficult to compare to anywhere in the world because we have a fully vaccinated and often booster population which is being tested daily with a PCR,” Mr Ducrey said from China.

“We are in a place that is safe and the behaviour of the people is very well understood and applied.”

China’s “zero Covid-19” strategy has been put to the test lately as there have been a number of community outbreaks in the past few weeks which have required the government to lock down millions of people in multiple cities to try and stop the spread of the highly-contagious Omicron variant.

The strategy has been met with more scepticism globally as virtually all countries have switched to a more endemic approach to fighting Covid-19.

Mr Ducrey said this strategy should bode well for China during the Games however, as if there is an outbreak, it will be small and instantly contained.

“When it comes to an outbreak in China, it is called a closed loop for that very reason. It means that there will be no contact between people outside and inside the loop,” he said.

“Should there be any outbreaks and now they are happening in different prefectures we are very much protected inside the loop for the very reason that there cannot be direct contact between the two entities.” SOUTH CHINA MORNING POST

 

Related topics

Beijing 2022 Olympics Covid-19 coronavirus fans International Olympic Committee

Read more of the latest in

Advertisement

Popular

Advertisement

Stay in the know. Anytime. Anywhere.

Subscribe to get daily news updates, insights and must reads delivered straight to your inbox.

By clicking subscribe, I agree for my personal data to be used to send me TODAY newsletters, promotional offers and for research and analysis.

Aa