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Driver fined S$4,000 for knocking down Supreme Court employee who was crossing road

SINGAPORE — While driving in front of Parliament House last year, a motorist collided with a pedestrian after failing to keep a proper lookout when turning right.

The driver, Gillain Liew Shue Ying, was fined S$4,000 and banned from driving all classes of vehicles for five years.
The driver, Gillain Liew Shue Ying, was fined S$4,000 and banned from driving all classes of vehicles for five years.

SINGAPORE — While driving in front of Parliament House last year, a motorist collided with a pedestrian after failing to keep a proper lookout when turning right.

The victim, an assistant registrar at the nearby Supreme Court, suffered many fractures and was given 49 days of hospitalisation leave.

On Tuesday (Feb 15), the driver, Gillain Liew Shue Ying, 43, was fined S$4,000 and banned from driving all classes of vehicles for five years.

She pleaded guilty to one charge of causing grievous hurt while driving without due care and attention under the Road Traffic Act.

The court heard that the victim, Mr Paul Tan Wei Chean, was using a pedestrian crossing, which showed a blinking green man, on April 5 last year at about 6pm.

Liew, who was travelling along High Street towards Parliament Place, made a right turn and collided with him.

It was drizzling and the road surface was wet, with light traffic flow and clear visibility.

Another pedestrian, who had been walking towards the junction and heard a “thud”, called the police to report the accident and said that Mr Tan was injured and bleeding.

He was taken to the Singapore General Hospital in Outram. A medical report stated that he had a “fracture dislocation” of his right shoulder as well as facial and eye-socket fractures, and other injuries.

A plastic and reconstructive surgical team treated his deep eyebrow cut. The court further heard that his shoulder injury will affect his daily living until the fracture heals, which can take between three and six months.

He was hospitalised for five days and discharged with 49 days of hospitalisation leave.

Asking for the maximum fine of S$5,000 for the offence, a police prosecutor said that Mr Tan had the right of way, but Liew's culpability was low and she had a clean driving record. She had also cooperated fully with the authorities and rendered help to Mr Tan after the accident.

In mitigation, Liew’s lawyer Josiah Zee asked for a S$4,000 fine instead. He told District Judge Salina Ishak that his client's driving record had been “unblemished” for the past 26 years and she had “learnt a heavy lesson”.

Mr Zee noted that she was a single mother whose young daughter was often in poor health. When the accident happened, her domestic worker had called her to say that the girl had a fever, the lawyer added. 

“That S$1,000 difference (in the fine amount) will go a long way in providing more medical care for her daughter,” he said. 

Liew could have been jailed for up to two years or fined up to S$5,000, or punished with both.

Related topics

court crime driving ban traffic offences pedestrian

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