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Bike-sharing pilot to start next year in Jurong East

SINGAPORE — A tender will be called next week for an operator to run a bike-sharing pilot in Jurong Lake District, which will see 1,000 bicycles available for use across 100 docking stations 24 hours daily.

Bike-sharing pilot to start next year in Jurong East

The inaugural Walk Cycle Ride SG Symposium on July 20, 2016. Photo: Koh Mui Fong/TODAY

SINGAPORE — A tender will be called next week for an operator to run a bike-sharing pilot in Jurong Lake District, which will see 1,000 bicycles available for use across 100 docking stations 24 hours daily.

Also to be launched is a six-month trial to allow cyclists and personal mobility device (PMD) users to carry their rides onto trains and buses at all times, instead of only during off-peak periods.

Transport Minister Khaw Boon Wan shared these plans during the inaugural Walk Cycle Ride SG Symposium on Wednesday (July 20) at the Mediacorp Campus. The projects are part of Singapore’s ongoing efforts to go “car-lite”.

The bike-sharing pilot in Jurong Lake District, which will be launched next year, will allow commuters to pick up a bicycle from one of the self-service docking stations located near their homes and ride it to MRT stations, offices or malls, where they can leave the bicycle at a docking station.

“There will be no need to worry about bicycle parking or theft,” said Mr Khaw. 

“LTA (Land Transport Authority) will soon be calling the tender for the operator for the bike-share system next week, and I look forward to this exciting development,” he added.

As for the six-month trial that lets users carry their foldable bikes and PMDs onto trains and buses at all hours, Mr Khaw said its success would depend on the users themselves.

“For this trial to be a success, public transport commuters and those who bring their bicycles and PMDs onto the buses and trains need to give-and-take, and be considerate to one another,” he added.

He urged cyclists and users of PMDs to exercise “common sense and consideration” when they bring their devices onto trains and buses. 

Mr Khaw also stressed the need for all road users — pedestrians, cyclists and motorists — to be considerate of one another. “In my several trips to Japan, I am always struck by how considerate the Japanese are to one another: Motorists look out for cyclists, cyclists look out for pedestrians, and pedestrians stay on one side of the path on the road.  No tension. No quarrel. No shouting. No one gets upset with anyone,” he said.

Wednesday’s symposium included a short panel discussion, where several suggestions on how to improve the public transport experience were raised.

One proposal was to build “bus stops of the future”, ones that have smart panels which can calculate the fastest journey, as well as ports to allow commuters to charge phones.

Mr Andrew Bujtor, managing director of Tower Transit, added that commuters themselves have a part to play in creating a pleasant experience on public transport. 

“I can invest a lot of time and focus on encouraging the other guys to smile, say good morning and interact with passengers. But you can imagine that on Monday morning 6am, you have already tried to smile and said hello to two full double-decker load of people — that’s 260 people — who have walked past you and not smiled back,” he said.

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