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Litterbugs made to clean up city areas under corrective work order, NEA says move will 'further drive home' the message

SINGAPORE — Corrective work order sessions were introduced at city areas for the first time this month as the National Environment Agency (NEA) seeks to increase the public visibility of such sessions.

A scene from a corrective work order session in the city area of Singapore.

A scene from a corrective work order session in the city area of Singapore.

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SINGAPORE — Corrective work order sessions were introduced at city areas for the first time this month as the National Environment Agency (NEA) seeks to increase the public visibility of such sessions.

The first two sessions were held in the Chinatown and Tanjong Pagar areas on Nov 15 and 17, NEA said in a news release on Friday (Nov 18).

The sessions in the city areas were part of the agency's move to raise public awareness of corrective work order and “further drive home” the impact of littering, it said.

Corrective work order, introduced in 1992, requires offenders to clean public areas for a minimum of three hours, up to a maximum of 12 hours.

"This regime serves to increase recalcitrant offenders’ awareness of the impact of littering, as well as experience the difficulties faced by cleaners," NEA added.

The agency will also continue to put up informative standees around locations identified for corrective work order sessions.

Its officers conduct targeted enforcement at littering hot spots and at areas where large number of individuals congregate, it said.

From 2017 to 2021, around 10,200 corrective work orders were issued to offenders.

Over the same period, there was an average of 27,200 tickets issued for littering and high-rise littering, with littering commonly occurring in neighbourhood centres, areas around hawker centres, MRT stations and malls.

The highest number of tickets issued in a single year was in 2018, when about 39,200 were handed out to offenders. In 2021, around 15,500 tickets were issued.

“The majority of littering offenders are male and fall within the age group of 18 to 35,” NEA said, adding that ground surveys showed that cigarette butts consistently top the list of littered items.

Individuals caught littering can face fines comprising a composition sum of S$300 for their first offence.

Offenders found guilty of littering offences can be fined up to S$2,000 for their first conviction, S$4,000 for the second conviction, and S$10,000 for the third and subsequent convictions. They can also be issued a corrective work order on top of the fine.

Mr Tony Teo, group director of environmental public health operations at NEA, said: “Everyone has a part to play in upholding high standards of cleanliness and public health in Singapore.” 

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littering corrective work order NEA

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