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MNC chief executive accused of performing oral sex on boy, 9

SINGAPORE — When his son’s classmates stayed over at his house after trick-or-treating on Halloween Day two years ago, a father apparently performed oral sex on one of them — a nine-year-old boy — twice.

The chief executive of a multinational corporation here has been accused of performing oral sex on nine-year-old boy. TODAY file photo

The chief executive of a multinational corporation here has been accused of performing oral sex on nine-year-old boy. TODAY file photo

SINGAPORE — When his son’s classmates stayed over at his house after trick-or-treating on Halloween Day two years ago, a father apparently performed oral sex on one of them — a nine-year-old boy — twice.

The trial against the parent of three sons — who cannot be identified to a gag order — began on Tuesday (Oct 3). The accused is a 47-year-old expat working as a chief executive officer of a multinational company here.

The incident happened about 45 minutes after the children were told to go to bed that night.

At about 11.15pm, the accused was said to have entered his youngest son’s room, where the victim was sleeping on the upper deck of a bunk bed with two other children, thrice.

In the first instance, the man allegedly spread the boy’s legs by pulling his knee cap towards him and the edge of the bed, before proceeding to touch the victim’s penis from outside his shorts. He then pulled the victim’s shorts down and touched it for a while before leaving the room.

Returning a short while later, the accused apparently reached out to the same boy’s groin area and performed oral sex on the boy.

The third time he entered the room, he was said to have pulled up the victim’s shorts after performing fellatio on the boy a second time.

Testifying the above on Tuesday, the victim who was feigning sleep throughout was aware of what happened to him, according to Deputy Public Prosecutors Christina Koh, Raja Mohan and Nicholas Lai. He could not sleep as the room felt warm.

After the incident, the boy packed his belongings and informed the accused that he wanted to go home as he felt unwell.

The victim’s father came to pick him up but, after finding what might have happened to his son, he drove back to the accused’s house and confronted him.

The boy crouched on the floorboard of the car’s backseat while an argument broke out between the two fathers, with the accused claiming that the accusations were untrue as he had been using his computer in his room.

The victim’s father lodged a police report two days after the incident.

On Tuesday, the court heard that no DNA evidence were collected from the bed sheet or the victim’s clothes, which had already been washed by the time the case was lodged.

Fingerprints were also not taken as evidence from the railing of the upper deck of the bunk bed.

Assistant Superintendent Then Lee Yong, who was the case’s primary investigator, said the accused occupied the house so his “fingerprints would be everywhere”.

The accused’s laptop was seized for investigations one and a half months later, and forensic investigations showed that his laptop was used for the first time at 11.21pm since 10pm that night — some six minutes after the alleged incident.

In all, 16 witnesses will lead evidence on the trial heard by Justice See Kee Oon. They will include the victim’s parents and forensic scientist Peter Douglas Wilson, who tested if the accused’s son’s bunk bed was able to withstand the accused’s weight without collapsing.

If convicted of committing the sexual assault, the accused would be jailed for at least eight years, but no more than 20 years, with at least 12 strokes of cane.

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