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Probation for 21-year-old who stalked residents from opposite block and stole from friend’s grandmother

SINGAPORE — A 21-year-old man was on Monday (Feb 7) given 18 months’ probation for stalking two residents who lived in a public housing block opposite the one where he resides, as well as stealing cash from his friend’s grandmother.

Soon Xian Feng discarded several of his victims' items that were placed outside their flat and posted comments about them on Facebook.
Soon Xian Feng discarded several of his victims' items that were placed outside their flat and posted comments about them on Facebook.
  • Soon Xian Feng wanted to befriend some people who lived in a housing block opposite the one where he resides
  • He left them a package and letter but began stalking them after they returned the items to his father
  • He discarded some of their belongings and posted comments about them on Facebook
  • Separately, he stole S$150 from his friend’s grandmother
  • He was given 18 months' probation 

SINGAPORE — A 21-year-old man was on Monday (Feb 7) given 18 months’ probation for stalking two residents who lived in a public housing block opposite the one where he resides, as well as stealing cash from his friend’s grandmother.

Soon Xian Feng, a Singaporean, pleaded guilty late last year to one charge each of unlawful stalking and theft. Two other similar charges were considered during sentencing.

Soon lived in the block opposite that of his victims, who cannot be named because of a court order to protect their identities.

The court heard that the victims noticed that he often “stared into their residence and waved at them”.

In February last year, he left a package containing two jerseys, a jar of cookies and a letter outside their unit. He wrote in the letter that he wanted to befriend them and that he was sorry for having taken photos of their flat.

The victims returned the items to Soon’s father, who assured them that he had asked his son to delete the photos.

Upset with them for rejecting his gift, Soon went to their flat on Feb 24 last year and took down their Chinese New Year decorations.

On April 6, he went there again and removed a shoe and slipper outside their unit, throwing them down the central rubbish chute.

About three weeks later, he removed their doormat and threw it down the chute.

The next month, on May 15, Soon took a parcel containing shampoo and a bottle for bowel care outside the unit and again threw it down the chute.

Two weeks later, he left cigarette butts between the metal gate and main door. Soon after, he also left two letters that he signed off in his name outside the unit, asking the victims not to close their window blinds as he wanted to see what they were doing at home.

The next day, he threw two eggs on the ground outside the unit.

A month then passed before he used information taken from his victims' accounts on professional network LinkedIn and posted it on social network Facebook, along with various comments.

In the Facebook post, he called them an “immature couple” and “lowballer couple”, among other things. 

Court documents did not state if the victims made a police report.

Soon’s father has since compensated S$189.30 to the victims.

STOLE FROM FRIEND'S GRANDMOTHER

In a separate incident, Soon was visiting his 14-year-old friend in February 2020 when the boy’s grandmother returned home and rushed to the toilet.

She placed her open handbag on the dining table, then told her grandson to head to his aunt’s place and asked Soon to leave.

The two boys left. Soon told his friend that he was going home and walked off, before loitering at the void deck and returning to his friend’s flat.

He pushed open the door and entered the unit. After stealing S$150 from his friend's grandmother, he left the flat and ran into his friend, who asked what he was doing. He ignored the question and fled.

Soon's father has since returned S$150 to the woman.

As part of his probation conditions, Soon must stay indoors from 10pm to 6am, go for vocational training or relevant programmes, and attend all treatment or therapy that his probation officer, the Institute of Mental Health or relevant agencies deem necessary.

His parents, who were in court on Monday, posted a S$5,000 bond to ensure his good behaviour.

Probation is usually offered to first-time offenders aged between 16 and 21. It does not result in a recorded criminal conviction, and allows young offenders to continue with their education or employment while serving their sentences.

Related topics

court crime probation stalking harassment theft

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