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Truck sinks into ground along Upper Changi Road East

SINGAPORE — A section of Upper Changi Road East caved in yesterday morning, causing a tipper truck to sink in, where it remained trapped for more than two hours.

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SINGAPORE — A section of Upper Changi Road East caved in yesterday morning, causing a tipper truck to sink in, where it remained trapped for more than two hours.

The driver was not injured and no other injuries were reported. The Land Transport Authority (LTA), which is investigating the incident, said the “depression” had appeared in the centre lane of the road at about 8.30am. Part of the passing truck slipped in, leaving its front wheels hanging in the air.

Two lanes of traffic were closed while the truck was recovered and the LTA deployed traffic wardens to divert and guide traffic flow. “The LTA is currently carrying out reinstatement works,” a spokesperson said in a statement.

The incident took place near construction works for the upcoming Downtown Line 3.

“We will also continue to monitor underground construction works in the surrounding area. This incident is not expected to impact the construction progress of the Downtown Line 3,” the spokesperson said.

In March last year, excavation works of Downtown Line Stage 2 caused an underground water pipe to rupture, resulting in a sinkhole on Woodlands Road. Earlier that month, a sinkhole had appeared twice on the same spot on Clementi Road. Other sinkhole incidents included one in January last year on Keppel Road that trapped a car for more than an hour.

Following the incidents, Transport Minister Lui Tuck Yew said in Parliament in April last year that the LTA would step up its monitoring efforts, such as by installing more extensometers to monitor for movement in soil and rock, and checking for voids under pavements or roads near excavation sites.

It would also work with utility agencies and companies to check their underground structures and records, as well as carry out any necessary removal or rectification works.

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