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Woman jailed for stalking couple who adopted her child, spreading their personal details online

SINGAPORE — Despite already having been fined S$4,000 for harassing the wife of her alleged former lover, a 44-year-old Singaporean began repeatedly posting their confidential personal details on social media for more than two years.
A woman was charged with stalking another by making 32 posts on Facebook and Instagram about the victim and the victim's husband between Dec 10, 2019 and Aug 23, 2020.
A woman was charged with stalking another by making 32 posts on Facebook and Instagram about the victim and the victim's husband between Dec 10, 2019 and Aug 23, 2020.
  • Angry that a couple wanted to adopt her daughter, a mother first stalked them in person at their home
  • She then turned to social media, spewing vitriol and posting personal details like their address and IC numbers
  • She was jailed after being found unsuitable for a community-based sentence

SINGAPORE — Despite already having been fined S$4,000 for harassing the wife of her alleged former lover, a 44-year-old Singaporean began repeatedly posting their confidential personal details on social media for more than two years.

These details in the publicly accessible posts included the full names, National Registration Identity Card numbers and address of the victim and her family members.

The accused also tagged third-party official channels such as the Ministry of Social and Family Development and even the United States’ Federal Bureau of Investigations.

She was upset that the couple had gotten custody of her biological child and eventually adopted the girl.

For this latest stalking spree, the woman was jailed for four months and two weeks on Friday (July 1).

She was convicted after claiming trial to one charge of stalking the victim by making 32 posts on Facebook and Instagram about the victim and the victim's husband between Dec 10, 2019 and Aug 23, 2020. But she had begun posting on social media in 2018.

While she suffers from a delusional disorder, the Institute of Mental Health found her unsuitable for a mandatory treatment order — a community sentencing option offered to offenders suffering from mental conditions that contributed to the offence.

Neither she nor the victim can be named due to a court order to protect the victim’s identity. 

ANGRY OVER CUSTODY BATTLE

On Friday, Deputy Public Prosecutor (DPP) Hidayat Amir argued that the victim suffered harm to her reputation and privacy, as well as profound emotional distress.

“(The accused) had cast scandalous allegations on the victim’s husband’s incestuous relationship with her biological children, naming them specifically, and on her involvement in rape, domestic terrorism, prostitution, bribery and kidnapping,” DPP Hidayat said while seeking five to seven months’ jail.

The accused had long harboured grievances towards the victim due to the long-drawn custody battle over her child, he noted.

During the trial that began in September last year, the victim testified that the accused had also supposedly filed more than 100 false police reports against her and her husband.

The husband allegedly had an affair with the accused, who then gave birth to the girl.

The victim told the court that in November 2013, her husband first took the child home in a “neglected and abandoned state”. The child was then two years old.

Shortly after, the accused made a false police report that he had kidnapped and raped the girl.

The couple was later granted custody and care and control of the toddler, while the accused was given access rights. This prompted the accused to file more than 100 police reports against them until 2020.

The adoption was finalised in November 2020.

The victim told the court that police officers turned up at their residence more than 50 times and “became a regular guest” there.

In May 2019, she filed at least three police reports about Twitter and Instagram accounts that the accused had set up. She also began checking the accused’s social media posts several times a week and compiled screenshots for the police.

The accused had posted photos of the adoption papers, including the victim's and her family’s full names, residential address and identification details. The accounts were later taken down when the victim reported them.

However, the accused then set up other accounts. She also sent Facebook friend requests to the victim and her two adult children.

In November 2019, the accused was convicted and fined for physically stalking them in July 2018 by pressing their doorbell multiple times and loitering outside their residence.

She began her latest offences barely a month later.

Court documents details some of the harassing posts she wrote, which the victim said some of her husband's friends had seen. One post read: “Even (the victim’s husband) rape me for a living until I am pregnant, he cannot dump his children away to buy houses for juz salon lady after raping these 2 children of mine!”

The accused had also been called to the police station in May 2020 and asked to delete the posts, to which she complied, but she persisted with posting some more over the next few months.

DPP Hidayat told the court that these allegations “plainly perverted any reasonable boundaries of decent expression”. The accused had acknowledged that she had no evidence to back up her accusations.

DPP Hidayat also highlighted the accused’s behaviour during the trial. She had repeatedly objected to lines of questioning and shouted for her child to be given back to her when the victim was testifying.

“It is clear that the accused lacked remorse,” he said.

As a repeat stalker, she could have been jailed for up to two years or fined up to S$10,000, or punished with both.

First-time offenders can be jailed for up to a year or fined up to S$5,000, or both.

Related topics

court crime stalking harassment harass adoption social media

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