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Revive anti-spitting campaign in Singapore

Whenever I go overseas on business, I dread the sight of what some people in Singapore do as well.
I am talking about spitting, which has serious environmental consequences.

The writer urges Singapore's authorities to revive a campaign to discourage people from spitting.

The writer urges Singapore's authorities to revive a campaign to discourage people from spitting.

Maggie Lim

Whenever I go overseas on business, I dread the sight of what some people in Singapore do as well.

I am talking about spitting, which has serious environmental consequences.

I have seen a student, swimming in a pool at the National University of Singapore, spit into the water at the end of a lap. 

Strolling in the Bishan-Ang Mo Kio Park before Chinese New Year last month, I saw a woman ahead of me slowing down and spitting on a field near a McDonald’s restaurant.  

On another occasion, a spit marked with blood lay on the carpet in front of my seat on a China Eastern Airlines flight from Shanghai to Beijing. 

If only there could be persistent awareness of the harm that spitting can cause toddlers rolling in grass patches, picnickers, animals out on walks, and others.

Spitting increases the risk of spreading any virus, not just the novel coronavirus.

Under the Environmental Public Health (Public Cleansing) Regulations, it is illegal to spit on streets, and in public service vehicles or public places in Singapore. Offenders could be fined.

One of Singapore’s earliest campaigns, launched in 1958, was a national drive to discourage people from spitting.

There is no better time to revive the campaign.

Have views on this issue or a news topic you care about? Send your letter to voices [at] mediacorp.com.sg with your full name, address and phone number.

Related topics

spitting campaign novel coronavirus coronavirus Wuhan virus

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